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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
will lose its lease. it comes after a long battle whether the area should be restored to wilderness. there was a very high-profile visit recently from sal azar to the bay area. how did that work its way to the top of the food chain, if you will? >> it seems odd, it's just one oyster farm. it had been operating there with special permission, so a 40-year lease that actually expired today. and what happened was the owner, kevin lundy, bought it in 2004, and he was hoping to get the parks service to extend his lease. it really became a battle. you had feinstein saying there are already these kinds of farms. and the area was slated to be destroyed already. >> how much environmental damage can an oyster farm do, and what did the science say about the damage that they were doing? >> that's what's interesting here. the science was the most political part of this. so the national parks service did an impact study. they said, well, we think that they do damage to the local habitat and they are disturbing harbor seals in the area, and that became very political. you have people saying they di
think mr. demint is out in the wilderness. it's true that the right-wing has gone into the wilderness after defeat wing has gone into the wilderness after defeat. but the ideas are so unpopular. surveys after sur vades say voters want fair taxes on the rich not these problems like social security medicare and medicaid cut. what's he going to be? it may be rush limbaugh's favorite foundation, but that's not going to do a lot at this moment with this discredited brand. >> well i am very fascinated by the underpinnings of the heritage foundation. we understanding demind is going to make a million dollarshalf a million dollars a year at heritage foundation but who gives heritage that money? what will they expect from demint in return? >> it's the same phalanx of people, these ideological billionaires who were sore losers in this election. they didn't get what they wanted. you have the koch brothers the olin foundation the bradley foundation. this is this network, this right-wing infrastructure that our money and politics 3 fuong writes ab
in the wilderness represent a majority of rank-and-file voters. the first that i alluded to that many on the right don't understand that properly understood gay-rights are compatible with fundamental principles and the essence of the libertarian philosophy is one of louis and let live people are concerned with unalienable rights. the government does that give those rights depended on your religion, economic class, a gender, or theoretically your sexual orientation. that is the way it is supposed to be. some libertarians already get that who have a special obligation to te
in the kentucky wilderness on sunday, february 12, he entered a world as harsh and primitive as if he had been born a thousand years earlier. there was no doctor. simply giving birth put his mother's life in mortal danger. the only help available with the old granny women as they called her, who was summoned from miles away. a newborn baby was washed up in water and carried up a hill from a chirping spring, wrapped in animal fur and laid on a bed of dried up corn husks on a mud floor. now in later years, lincoln would allow his political supporters to glamorize his frontier roots. they made him out to be a sort of backless superman, but the log cabin had no romance for him. lincoln knew first-hand the dead-end life of an undeveloped economy. all the hardship and sorrow of what was called vintage living. his strongest boyhood memories were of death and near-death. the time he almost drowned as a boy. the time he was knocked cold by a kicking horse. his younger brother, his mother and his best friend in the world. this boy blessed with a naturally brilliant mind felt like an alien on a hostile p
boyfriend in the snowy wilderness talks about her ordeal after these messages. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. we're for the individual. the food lover. the movie lover. the road tripper. and the music mentor. ♪ we're for the gamer. the play maker. the page turner. and the up-all-nighters. so when we set out to make a smart phone we didn't make one for all of us. we made one for each of us. new windows phone. reinvented around you. we made one for each of us. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your
on the wealthy 65% to 31%. republicans, i think they're in the wilderness. they face a changing demographical situation in this country they don't know how to deal with. they've not dealt with women's issues properly and they have ignored immigration reform. it's time for the republicans to take a page out of the "ed show" and let's get to work. i'm joined tonight by congressman jim clyburn of south carolina and also eugene robinson, msnbc political analyst and associate editor and pulitzer prize winning columnist for "washington post" but most of all i can title them both as two distinguished gentlemen from south carolina. gentlemen, good to have you with us tonight. congressman, you first. is the congress -- >> thank you so much. >> is the congress better or worse off with a guy like jim demint? >> well, i wouldn't put it that way, ed. i think that jim is a very principled guy. i never agreed with a single one of his principles, but he's a very principled guy. he is doing what he thinks he needs to do in order to further his cause. he has had some real serious problems with his relationship
. >> yes! >> yes come. >> tvoice wilderness defending the alien senate. >> hang on to my peeps over here come on. you're right about pa. part of it. you can say and put rand paul and cruz in this right wing ideological death trap, but the fact of the matter is, there's a whole new dynamic that's going to come, that's going to unfold in the senate, largely around the point that was just made. when you've got cruz working with the nrc he's got to keep in mind the goal is to elect senators. you cannot come in with this doctrinaire point of view and applying that across the country. not every senate race is the same. they're not equal. you have to be much more measured and balanced. ann coulter is right. i've been saying it for a long time. the party has to get in the real. you got your clocks cleaned. step back and assess how you move forward and take your brand, rejuvenate it. you don't have to dumb down your values, walk away from your principles, but make them relevant to the conversation that the country wants to have with this administration and with the leadership in the house and the
plans to turn the land into a marine wilderness area, and as a result, the oyster company and 30 employees are out of work. kevin is the owner of drake's bay and now suing for an injunction to keep his business open. good morning to you, kevin. >> good morning, gretchen. how are you? >> gretchen: doing just fine. thank you for getting up so early. so tell me what you've been doing for all these years, your oyster farm. >> the oyster farm is really kind of a main stay in our community. we produce about a third of the oysters grown in the state of california. we get about 50,000 visitors a year who love this place, been here for over eight decades and the community and our county and san francisco bay area loves ush washington, d.c. >> gretchen: so the interior department wants to shut you down. why? >> well, actually a small handful of folks who are really wilderness activists who care deeply about getting people off the land, i think is the best we can tell, want to give up something to create a humanless landscape and it's a little strange because national sea shore was created
, forced to spend two chilly nights in the wilderness recall the moment they saw rescuers. >> they were like angels down the road. they were. i really thought we were done. >> we'll have more details on how they made it out alive. >>> and hang onto your phone. what we're learning about a rash of smartphone thefts on muni buses in san francisco. >>> happy holidays to you. our quiet weather turning quite active into the afternoon. moderate rain expected along with breezy conditions and the possibility of isolated thunderstorms. >>> a group of snowshoers is home safe after getting lost in oregon's mount hood. the group had to san jose a makeshift shelter and call for help. laura rios was there. >> reporter: welcomed sight this christmas eve. carrying three snowshoers back to their families after two nights in the elements on mount hood. mark kelsey, margarita its strada and debra schindler set out on know shoes saturday morning with plans to camp in a hut that night for one of their birthdays. instead, they found the trail will washed out during the summer from flooding. >> the reality wit
. it added wilderness protection to over 2 million acres, it designates 1,100 miles of wild and scenic rivers, added more than 2,800 miles to the national trail system, and i was proud to be part of the effort to enact that legislation. finally, i'll make a few comments on the way that we in the congress conduct our own business. any fair assessment has to conclude that in this area we have lost ground in the last two decades. public opinion of the performance of congress is at an all-time low, and it is not hard to see why. i'll mention three obvious wears in which the functioning of congress has worsened. first is the willingness of some in congress to shut down the government. in 1995 we saw the leadership of the house of representatives demonstrate that they considered refusing to fund the government as an acceptable bargaining ploy in that efforts to prevail in disputes with president clinton and democrats on spending issues. since 1995, that think th threao withhold appropriations has been made several more times, and as we saw then, shuttlin shutting e government is harmful, wasteful t
's not afraid to be a voice in the wilderness. and all too often, we don't agree with dennis. but we always understood where his passion comes from. and it comes from his deep faith and the fact that he realy believes in america just as the rest of us do. but on a personal note, dennis has become a good friend of mine. we share a deep conviction about obesity in our nation and ways to conquer it. and who knows, maybe on the outside, we will work together to try to find solutions to that. to steve austria, who just stood at this podium. i got to know steve in the state legislature. while we didn't really work together on bill well, actually went to arizona to watch ohio state win its national championship and it was there that i realy got to know him and his wife on a personal level. it was there he shared with me his dream to one day serve in this congress. i'm so glad he was able to let that dream come true. to my good friend steve latourette. when you come as a special election you don't get this orientation that people get when they come as a class. you get elected and you're thrown on t
and the wilderness. you talk about antietam and you talk about shiloh, manassas, all these battles people defending what they think, a way of life for slavery or what have you, all of that, all that bloodshed settle this contradiction. and we won. we have our country. and i like to go to gettysburg to say to my clerks, do we deserve this? do we deserve the sacrifice for the country that we have and are we living up to that? are we doing our part? >> just go anyplace. think of the people at the battle of the bulge or think of them at you know, during any war and just ask yourself, you know, let's assume without debating whether you should have had this, that, this war that, we have done our part and the thing i was told, was going to be a priest. that was really the only sort of goal that i had. what is a priest? you are called to do something. every ex-seminarian it's all nice like -- your call now is to do your part. to be able to earn the right to be here. >> you can mention in your book very prominently on the first page in the last page and i will mention it again, god. the declaration of indep
man who came first and carved his vast rangeland out of the wilderness saw himself facing destruction as the homesteaders settled on his range, fencing him off from the grass and the water. the homesteader had many names in the west-- squatter, nester, and sometimes, with truth, rustler. the cattlemen struck back, fast and hard. ♪ ( dog barking ) what are you doin' here, nicky? ( barking continues ) mom? mom! mom, what happened? what's the matter? oh-- they-- ( sobs ) oh, homer. ma, where's pa? ma, what happened? ( nicky barks ) homer! hey! hey, hold up there! homer? what do you think you're doing? that's our cow. i know it is, son. it's got our brand on her. can't you read it? what have you done with my pa? where is he? where's my pa? have you done anything to him? what's goin' on? tell me! why don't you go look after your mother, son? your pa would want that. ♪ ma? ma, that was judge garth's foreman. what are they doin' to pa? i'm no thief. that's the last time i'm gonna say it. you're murderers. every last one of you-- murderers. major: you say that cow of yours over there is t
about the carnage and the lives lost, the great battle before in fredericksburg and the wilderness. you talk about antietam and you talk about shiloh, manassas, all these battles people defending what they think, a way of life for slavery or what have you, all of that, all that bloodshed settle this contradiction. and we won. we have our country. and i like to go to gettysburg to say to my clerks, do we deserve this? do we deserve the sacrifice for the country that we have and are we living up to that? are we doing our part? >> just go anyplace. think of the people at the battle of the bulge or think of them at you know, during any war and just ask yourself, you know, let's assume without debating whether you should have had this, that, this war that, we have done our part and the thing i was told, was going to be a priest. that was really the only sort of goal that i had. what is a priest? you are called to do something. every ex-seminarian it's all nice like -- your call now is to do your part. to be able to earn the right to be here. >> you can mention in your book very prominently o
in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not actively choose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in completing the outstanding work. i urge my colleagues to join me in opposing today's rule so we can try to get back to d -- get back to work. toda
that we should not be crying out in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not activelyhoose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in completing the outstanding work. i urge my colleagues to join me in opposing today's rule so we can try to get
'm sure he feels like he's a voice in the wilderness by doing that, but every single week each of us gets this special appeal from emanuel cleaver to be what we should be, stewards much our country and to do it in a way that does not demean our institution and demean each other and to advocate for what we believe, but to do it in a way that is more human and kind. i want to join with my colleagues in thanking him for his leadership, but most of all i want to thank him for the tremendous role model he has been for our institution to try to make our institution a better place in which to serve and to try to make each of us better members of this institution. i yield back, mr. chairman. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. neal, for five minutes. mr. neal: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. neal: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, let me also thank reverend cleaver at his request i can't -- series of social security and spent the better part of two days with him and i got op
is recognized. >> bill designated a mountain peak at the northern border of the wilderness in yosemite national park in california as mount andrea lawrence. mr. grijalva: a former olympic skier and conductee into the u.s. national ski hall of fame was a community leader in northern california who worked to protect these special places and communities in the eastern sierras. we applaud senator boxer and congress mckeon for this legislation, we support the passage of this legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from washington. mr. hastings: mr. speaker, i have no more requests for time and i'm prepared to yield back if my friend from arizona is prepared to yield back. grigri mr. speaker, yield back -- mr. grijalva: mr. speaker, i yield back. mr. hastings: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: all time having expired the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass senate bill 925. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those vot
, i would imagine he would argue the republican house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflective -- you tell me. did the house change? >> it is a reflection of polarization that takes place at
wilderness area. a -- an zend due to lack of maintenance would be devastating. it makes sense for the pipeline to use the existing roadbed for highway 2 in order to minimize the economic impact. my legislation simply solve this is government-made problem by allowing the national park service to allow maintenance on the pipeline. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from the mariana islands is recognized. mr. sablan: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sablan: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. sablan: h.r. 4606 clarifies that the national park service may issue right-of-way permits for a natural gas pipeline in glacier national park. the pipeline already exists. the senator introduced this legislation in march of this year. we do not object to this legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from utah is recognized. mr. bishop: i have only myself as the
in nine states as protected wilderness, including a 5,300 acre national monument to protect fossils located north of las cru kr*e s, new mexico. -- i can say senator bingaman is among the greatest who set aside public land for future generations, people like roosevelt and others. senator bingaman takes his rightful place there. mr. president, for the last three decades in this body senator bingaman has been a tireless advocate for the people of new mexico, a determined champion for the future of clean and renewable energy for the united states. he's been an outstanding senator, a wonderful friend. i join with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle in wishing jeff and ann the very best in the years ahead. mr. president, with that, i yield the floor. and i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: a senator: ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. gillibrand: i rise today to urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support our efforts to come to the relief of millions of
thing. both parties benefit by taking turns in the wilderness every now and then. over the past 10 years i have offered hundreds of amendments, privileged resolutions and points of order in this chamber. in fact, the vast majority of these offerings resulted in far more red marks next to members' names than green marks up on the wall above me. but i like to think that we, over time, made a difference and that this institution is better for it. in addition to my own capable staff, both here and in arizona, i want to thank those who staffed this chamber. from the floor staff who answered the leadership on both sides of the aisle, to the clerks, to the stenographers, to the parliamentarians who keep us operating within the rules, to the cloakroom staff who keep us fed and remind us when to vote. i found that there resides in all of these individuals an abiding love and deep respect for this institution. most of all i want to thank my family, my wife, sheryl, ryan, alexis, austin, tanner, and dallen. they have been supportive, patient and long suffering in dealing with a schedule that is any
house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. and the more responsive it will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflect
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)